Tag Archives: food vending machines

New York Employers Upgrade Workplace Amenities Like Free Snacks And Other Perks

New York businesses that are serious about keeping their Spinning at the gymemployees happy at work have more options today than ever before. Providing food and refreshments at work remains one of the most important benefits New York employers can provide their workers. Employers should, however, consider all possible ways to keep workers happy on the job.
Over the last two years, employers have focused more on workplace amenities, reports The Wall Street Journal. Many New York workplaces are offering free snacks and drinks and some are going far beyond that with places employees can relax and recharge. Such amenities keep employees happy and they keep top-performers from changing jobs.
As companies try to put themselves on a path to faster growth, some are mimicking the workplace practices—and lavish perks—at technology behemoths like Google Inc. and Facebook Inc.
In industries as varied as insurance, electrical contracting and auto loans, managers are spending on office upgrades and amenities like free food and comped vacations, claiming that such trappings elevate jobs in even the more unglamorous industries. This helps to recruit employees and to convince high performers to stay.
John Bremen, a managing director with human-resources consulting firm Towers Watson, has seen squash courts and lap pools at some companies, and at one bank, rest areas for employees complete with sofas and soothing music—something that wouldn’t have occurred a decade ago.
Alterra Chief Executive David Royce says the writings of Zappos.com Inc. CEO Tony Hsieh prompted his focus on employee happiness, which Hsieh claims breeds corporate success. Royce spent hours scrolling through photos of tech-company offices online, concluding “it’s not fair that they have all the fun.”
Royce says he now invests more than 10% of Alterra’s profit in food, events and amenities each year, and claims it is paying off. Employees hailing from competing pest-control companies increase their sales by 70% in their first full year at Alterra, and 96% stay at the company for at least a full year.
iStock_000010820691SmallTech giants have long used recreational workspaces and generous perks to impress recruits and set themselves apart from typical corporate offices. Workplace designers like Primo Orpilla, whose design firm Studio O+A has created offices for Uber Technologies Inc. and Yelp Inc., say they are hearing from finance and contracting firms looking for similarly eye-catching amenities—even as some Silicon Valley companies play down some of the wackier touches.
Scott Lesizza, a founding principal of WorkWell Partners, which sells office furnishings, says about half the clients he meets cite Google as a model for their workplaces.
The New York office culture is changing, slowly but surely. The economy, the need for a work/life balance, rising costs and stretched budgets all influence the culture of an office. Where some companies will offer employees many perks, others will offer few and try to compensate in other ways.
Healthy Vending is experiencing this metamorphosis in New York. Healthy Vending can meet the future needs with trendier offerings and ways to help locations offer affordable, yet quality perks.
For more information about healthy snack and beverage options available to the vending industry, contact your New York City vending partner, Healthy Vending, at 917-572-3671 to discuss your customized break room solution.

Convenience Drives Consumer Breakfast Choices in New York City

Health experts have long noted that breakfast is the most important photodune-3139450-granola-bar-mmeal of the day. Many New York workers are aware of this, but because they are rushed for time in the morning, they often skip breakfast. The availability of healthy breakfast choices has increased in recent years, and this makes the work place vending machine an important benefit for busy New Yorkers who want to eat breakfast.

A 2012 study entitled, “The Benefits of Breakfast Consumption to Combat Obesity and Diabetes in Young People” found that skipping breakfast was strongly associated with obesity. It reported that young people eat breakfast regularly have a higher-quality diet, eat fewer unhealthy snacks and have better body weight management compared with those who skip breakfast.

According to Mintel, the U.S. breakfast foods category is set to increase 26 percent between 2012 and 2017. Consumers have noticed the importance of breakfast and they have appealed for convenient, healthful who and tasteful products to start their day. But for many New Yorkers, getting breakfast has been difficult due to time constraints.
A new study by Instantly indicates more than half of Americans still do not consistently eat breakfast every day of the week. Twelve percent rarely eat breakfast at all. Those who rarely eat breakfast cite lack of time is the second most-selected reason for not doing so, next to not having an appetite in the morning.
Less than half of the respondents (47%) eat breakfast daily and only 25% eat it three or more times a week.
When asked which meal they are most likely to skip, 40% answered breakfast, the most common answer.
young woman eating yogurt“In the U.S., with longer work days that break out of the 9-to-5 model, timing and convenience has become a deciding factor in what many Americans eat in the morning,” said Andy Jolls, chief marketing officer at Instantly. “But that doesn’t mean demand for breakfast foods is low. If companies can provide breakfast in a format that accommodates busy schedules while appealing to taste and nutrition, they could see significant incremental growth.”
When time is a constraint, consumers are likely to grab something on the go (43%) or skip the meal all together (21%). Sixty three percent of respondents eating on the go said they might grab something from home, while 45% will go to a drive-thru restaurant and 31% will stop at a convenience store or gas station.
Only 14% said they would get something at work.
When choosing breakfast, the biggest consideration is taste, cited by 31%; followed closely by health, cited by 30%; followed by convenience, 21%; cost 9%; quality, 6%; and portion size, 2%.
The low number of people getting breakfast at work likely reflects the perception that tasty and healthy options are not available at work. This is where a service like Healthy Vending can provide an important benefit to New York workers.
When we announced Healthy Vending, the positive consumer reaction in New York City confirmed everything we believed about the demand for these products. One of the most unique aspects about our company is that we provide these healthy products conveniently for consumers.
Healthy Vending provides a service that will allow New York City locations to offer their employees and/or patrons the ability to remain on-premises for their nutrition and energy needs.
For more information about healthy snack and beverage options available to the vending industry, contact your New York City vending partner, Healthy Vending, at 917-572-3671 to discuss your customized break room solution.

FDA Orders Elimination Of Trans Fats From Food; What’s Taken So Long?

Why does it take the government so long to make laws to protect fda-logopublic health after scientific evidence confirms that certain types of food need to be regulated? The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decided in June that artificial trans fat will have to disappear from the American diet. The department has given food manufacturers three years to remove the partially hydrogenated oils, or PHOs, from their products.
Healthy Vending applauds the government’s action. But the fact that it has taken the FDA so long to issue the removal of trans fats is concerning for New York consumers. It demonstrates the need for New York consumers to stay informed about food health issues.
Healthy Vending was established in 2000 on account of the high levels of fat used in many snacks. Trans fats in particular have concerned health experts who have advocated government action.
In response to these concerns, the government required food manufacturers to list trans fat content on labels in 2006.
In 2013, the FDA made a tentative determination that trans fats were no longer safe .
Clearly, it has taken a long time for the FDA to require manufacturers to remove trans fats.
Corazonas“The FDA’s actions to ultimately remove artificial trans fat from the diets of all Americans is a tremendous step forward in the fight against heart disease,” says Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association. “Eating a healthy diet is a critical element of prevention, and prevention is the key to conquering heart disease – our nation’s No. 1 killer. Taking artificial trans fat out of foods will help Americans achieve this goal and build lives free of heart disease.”
But the FDA’s recent action is only one step in protecting New York consumers’ health in relation to trans fat. As Healthy Vending is well aware, food labels do not communicate everything a consumer needs to know about trans fats.
New York consumers who check food labels for trans fats may not realize that even though the label reads, “Trans fats 0 grams per serving,” that does not necessarily mean zero, according to Ronda Elsenbrook, R.D., L.D., a registered dietitian in the Nutritional Services department at Kelsey-Seybold Clinic in Houston, Texas. Elsenbrook recently told CNN that manufacturers that produce foods containing less than 0.5 grams of trans fats can round that number down to zero. So, you might actually be getting 0.4 grams of trans fats per serving, even though the label reads 0 grams.
When we launched Healthy Vending in the greater New York City 3 Luna Barsarea in 2000, we understood that consumers want healthier snacks and beverages. There was plenty of research to prove this. Lots of school districts in and around New York City were enacting healthy food and beverage rules.
For more information about healthy snack and beverage options available to schools and your local business, contact your New York City vending partner, Healthy Vending, at 917-572-3671.