Centers for Disease Control Updates Its School Health Index To Help New York City Schools Fight Childhood Obesity

The Center for Disease Control (CDC), partnering with the Alliance iStock_000004501197XSmallfor a Healthier Generation, has updated its School Health Index (SHI). The 2014 SHI guides school-based obesity prevention and health promotion efforts. The SHI is a valuable tool that New York City area schools can use to help reduce childhood obesity in addition to other measures.
Healthy Vending welcomes the Alliance for a Healthier Generation and the CDC as partners in its efforts to reduce childhood obesity in New York City area schools. Healthy Vending helps New York City students stay healthy and ready to learn.
The Alliance has replaced its Healthy Schools Program Inventory with the School Health Index (SHI). By offering a unified assessment tool, the CDC and the Alliance make it easier for schools to implement policies and practices that can help students stay healthy and ready to learn. SHI benefits include:
• Less confusion about which evidence-based assessment tool to use.
• Monitoring and alignment of school-based health policies and practices with national surveillance systems.
• Better coordination of training and technical assistance between the CDC and the Alliance.
High school students eating in the school cafeteriaTwo versions of the SHI exist and can be accessed from both the CDC and Alliance’s Healthy Schools Program websites, https://schools.healthiergeneration.org/ and www.cdc.gov/healthyyou.
The SHI Self-Assessment & Planning Guide 2014 is an online self-assessment and planning tool that schools can use to improve their health and safety policies and programs. It’s easy to use and completely confidential.
The SHI was developed by CDC in partnership with school administrators and staff, school health experts, parents, and national non-governmental health and education agencies to:
• Enable schools to identify strengths and weaknesses of health and safety policies and programs.
• Enable schools to develop an action plan for improving student health, which can be incorporated into the School Improvement Plan.
• Engage teachers, parents, students, and the community in promoting health-enhancing behaviors and better health.
The SHI is based on CDC’s research-based guidelines for school health programs, which identify the policies and practices most likely to be effective in reducing youth health risk behaviors.
The SHI 2014 features:
• Updated nutrition content to align with new USDA regulations, iStock_000016672920XSmallincluding Smart Snacks in School nutrition standards.
• Revised physical education content to align with updated national standards and advancements in physical activity programming.
The Alliance for a Healthier Generation’s Healthy Schools Program has adopted CDC’s SHI assessment tool to help schools assess their current policies and practices as well as track progress over time.
For more information about healthy snack and beverage options available to schools, contact your New York City vending partner, Healthy Vending, at 917-572-3671.

Nielsen Survey Quantifies Growing Demand For Healthy Snacks; Right On The Money In New York City

When we launched Healthy Vending in the greater New York City snikiddyarea in 2000, we understood that consumers want healthier snacks and beverages. There was plenty of research to prove this. Lots of school districts in and around New York City were enacting healthy food and beverage rules.
When we announced Healthy Vending, the positive consumer reaction in New York City confirmed everything we believed about the demand for these products. One of the most unique aspects about our company is that we provide these healthy products conveniently for consumers.
The Nielsen Global Survey of Snacking polled more than 30,000 consumers in 60 countries in 2014 and found that consumers everywhere are shifting their habits to healthy snacking. This survey is one of many we have seen that confirms the big demand for healthy snacks.
Hint WaterGlobal demand means a lot in New York City, since it is a very global community.
This survey also quantifies another important fact about snacking today; snacking habits are changing. Snacking is becoming a form of meal replacement as consumers’ work schedules are less structured. Hence, consumers who want to follow a healthy lifestyle want their snacks to be healthy because the snacks are now a more important part of their daily lifestyles.
Healthy Vending provides a service that will allow New York City locations to allow their employees and/or patrons to remain on-premises for their nutrition and energy needs. Hence, employees and partrons value the location as an employer and/or business provider.
Here are some highlights of the recent Nielsen Global Survey of

Snacking Survey:beautiful brunette holding apples apples
Snacks with all natural ingredients are rated as very important by 45% of respondents and moderately important by 32%; natural ingredients were the highest of 20 health attributes queried. Following this came the absence of artificial colors (44%), absence of GMOs (43%) and absence of artificial flavors (42%).
• One third of respondents want snacks low in sugar (34%), salt (34%), and calories (30%).
• Environmentally-conscious consumers think it important that snacks be sourced sustainably (35%), organic (34%) and use local herbs (25%).
• Nutrition is the leading reason why respondents snack (63%), followed by getting an energy boost (61%).
• One-fourth of those surveyed want snacks that have either low or no carbohydrates.
• About one-third are looking for beneficial ingredients, rating fiber (37%), protein (31%) and whole grains (29%) as very important attributes in the snacks they eat.
• Environmentally-conscious consumers believe it is very important that snacks include ingredients that are sourced sustainably (35%), are organic (34%) and use local herbs (25%).
• While snacks are still consumed to satisfy hunger between meals, 45% consume snacks as a meal alternative—52% for breakfast, 43% for lunch and 40% for dinner.

For more information about healthy snack and beverage options available to the vending industry, contact your New York City vending partner, Healthy Vending, at 917-572-3671 to discuss your customized break room solution.